Flamborough Manor

The East and North Ridings of Yorkshire

EAST RIDING: The landscape consists of a crescent of low chalk hills, the Yorkshire Wolds, surrounded by the low lying fertile plains of Holderness and the Vale of York. The Humber Estuary and North Sea mark its southern and eastern limits. Archaeological investigations have revealed artefacts and structures from all historical periods since the last ice age.

Geology

Geologically the East Riding district is split into three parts: the eastern section of the Vale of York (a belt of sandstone overlain by glacial deposits); the middle part is the Yorkshire Wolds, a chalk formation which extends from the Humber to the coast at Flamborough Head; while the south-east of the district is the low-lying coastal plain of Holderness, which faces east to the North Sea.

Landscape

The Wolds area takes the form of an elevated, gently rolling plateau, cut by numerous deep, steep- sided, flat-bottomed valleys of glacial origin. Surface water is quite scarce throughout the Wolds. At Flamborough Head the Wolds rise up to form high chalk cliffs, where there are water-worn caves and stacks along the shore. Flamborough Headland is designated a Heritage Coast.

Places of Interest

There is a wide range of interesting places to visit in the East Riding. These include historic buildings such as Burnby Hall, Burton Agnes Manor House, Burton Agnes Hall, Sewerby Hall, Skipsea Castle and the gun battery of Fort Paull. The religious edifices of the Rudston Monolith, Beverley Minster and Beverley Friary, and Howden Minster can be visited at all seasons.
As the range of our activities is so diverse, we have a number of different websites. The main Flamborough Manor site, which is where you are now, focuses primarily on accommodation (bed & breakfast) but has brief details of all our other activities. To allow for more information to be presented on these other activities, we have other self- contained web-sites and some of the links you will encounter while browsing these pages will take you to these separate sites. To return to this site, simply go to the LINKS page, which is common to all our sites.
Touring and Directions
Flamborough is well situated for touring the coast and places of interest in the East and North Ridings of Yorkshire. The cities of York and Hull are forty-four and thirty-seven miles away respectively, while two of the most interesting towns in the area — Beverley to the south and Whitby to the north — are within easy reach. Closer still are the resort towns of Bridlington (4 miles) and Scarborough (20 miles), as well as picturesque, unspoiled, Filey (12 miles). Country houses open to the public (not all year round) include the magnificent Castle Howard, delightful Burton Agnes Hall, Sledmere House with its famous Turkish room, Sewerby Hall, Burton Constable Hall and Beningborough. Others sites of interest are Kirkham Priory, Pickering and Helmsley Castles and Wharram Percy, a deserted medieval village. A considerable part of the North Riding has been preserved as the North York Moors National Park, through which runs the North York Moors Railway, operating steam and diesel train trips through the Park. On the fringes of the Park are the ruins of Rievaulx, Byland and Whitby Abbeys. Finally, dotted along the coast, are isolated fishing villages redolent of another age. Perhaps best known is Robin Hood’s Bay; however, Runswick Bay and Staithes are well worth a visit.
Burton Agnes Hall A   Norman   Manor   house,   the   lower   chamber   of   which   still   remains,   was   first   constructed   on   this   site   in   1173.   Since   then   the   property   has never   been   sold,   though   it   has   passed   from   family   to   family   on   occasions   when   the   male   line   has   ended.   In   1599   Sir   Henry   Griffith,   who   had obtained   the   property   via   the   female   line,   began   construction   of   a   new   house   on   the   site,   using   the   architect   Robert   Smithson.   Smithson, who   was   Master   Mason   to   Elizabeth   I,   also   built   Longleat,   Wollaton   and   Hardwick.   Building   was   complete   by   about   1610,   with   stone   quoins contrasting   the   red-brick   of   the   house.   The   estate   subsequently   passed   to   the   Boynton   family   when   Sir   Henry   Griffith's   daughter   married Sir   Matthew   Boynton,   and   remained   in   the   Boynton   family   until   the   end   of   the   eighteenth   century   when   the   estate   was   inherited   by   Cecily Boynton,   who   married   Thomas   Lamplugh   Wickham.   Since   the   1950s   the   house   has   been   extensively   restored,   including   the   stunning   Long Gallery. Now run by a registered charity, the estate remains a lived-in family home occupied by descendants of the Boynton family.
Castle Howard In   1699   the   Third   Earl   of   Carlisle,   having   rejected   the   plans   of   a   leading   architect,   approached   the   dramatist   John   Vanbrugh,   who,   at   that   point, had   never   built   anything   in   his   life.   Vanbrugh   subsequently   recruited   Nicholas   Hawksmoor   to   assist   him   in   the   practical   side   of   design   and construction.   Although   the   final   western   wing   of   the   Garden   Front   was   completed   by   1709,   building   proceeded   for   the   next   century.   Indeed, further   alterations   were   still   being   made   in   the   last   quarter   if   the   19th   century   as   part   of   a   plan   to   harmonize   both   wings.   Tragically,   on   the morning   of   9   November   1940,   fire   broke   out   in   the   South-East   Wing   and   swept   through   the   house   into   the   Great   Hall,   destroying   the   dome and   nearly   twenty   rooms.   In   1960-62   the   dome   was   rebuilt   and   redecorated,   and,   as   time   and   money   permit,   the   gradual   task   of   restoring   the fire-damaged sections continues.
Whitby Abbey Whitby   Abbey,   imposingly   sited   on   the   cliff   top,   was   founded   in   AD657.   Seven   years   later,   the   Synod   was   held   here   to   debate   the   dating   of Easter.   The   Abbey   was   destroyed   during   a   Viking   invasion   in   AD867,   but   was   revived   by   one   of   William   the   Conqueror’s   knights   in   the   late   1070s. By   1220,   the   Norman   church   proved   too   small   for   the   many   pilgrims   who   visited   it,   and   rebuilding   began.   However,   after   its   dissolution   in   1538, the Abbey passed to the Cholmley family, whose house was constructed in large part from materials plundered from the monastery. Approaching   the   Abbey   from   the   town   involves   a   climb   of   199   steps   (however,   car   access   is   available   from   the   south).   Be   sure   also   to   visit   the exquisite St Mary's Church, with its unusual 18th century interior, carved by ship-builders.
Lastingham Nestling   near   the   edge   of   the   North   York   Moors   National   Park,   close   to   the   picture-postcard   Hutton-le-Hole,   Lastingham   is   typical   of   the unspoiled   Moors'   villages.   A   monastery   was   founded   here   in   654   by   St   Cedd,   and   flourished   until   the   Danes   destroyed   it   in   the   ninth   century.   In 1078   the   Abbot   of   Whitby   persuaded   the   King   to   restore   Lastingham,   and   work   began   on   the   abbey.   However,   only   the   crypt,   which   has   has survived unaltered, was completed before the Abbot and his monks left abruptly to set up a new monastery in York.
Beverley The   first   Saxon   Church   in   Beverley   was   established   by   John   of   Beverley   about   AD700.   By   AD937   a   second   church   had   been   built   to   replace   the first,   and   this   church   was   granted   the   right   of   sanctuary   by   King   Athelstan.      This   second   church   was   subsequently   enlarged   but   by   about   1170   a third   church,   this   time   built   in   the   Norman   Style,   replaced   the   old   Saxon   church.   The   current   Minster   was   commenced   about   1220,   with   the construction   taking   two   centuries.   It   remains   to   this   day   one   of   the   best-loved   of   English   churches,   but   the   town   itself   is   also   not   be   missed.   It remains a lively, thriving Wolds' market town with a wealth of historic architecture.
Robin Hood’s Bay Located   a   few   miles   south   of   Whitby   is   the   dramatic   sweep   of   Robin   Hood's   Bay.   The   village   itself   nestles   in   a   cleft   and   is   barely   visible   in   the photograph.   Car   parking   is   readily   available   at   the   top   of   the   village.   The   walk   down   to   the   beach   involves   a   steep   climb   back,   but   is   well   worth the effort.
Bridlington, showing the Harbour
How to find us : If   approaching   from   Bridlington   on   the   B1255,   the   road   sweeps   down   a   hill   into   the   village,   passing   Flamborough   Parish   Church (St   Oswald’s)   on   the   right.   Just   past   the   church   the   road   turns   sharply   to   the   left   at   the   junction   of   Tower   Street   and   Lighthouse Road.   The   Manor   House   is   on   this   corner,   but   you   must   turn   right   into   Lighthouse   Road   and   we   are   the   first   entrance   on   the left.   Look   for   signs   announcing   "Antiques   and   Sweaters"   —   the   stable   at   the   front   of   the   house   has   been   converted   into   a   small shop;   the   house   itself   is   set   back   from   the   road.   There   is   ample   parking   in   front   of   the   shop.   Please   note   that   the   Tower   Street entrance to the property is no longer in use and that access is only available via Lighthouse Road. If   approaching   from   the   Scarborough   direction   on   the   B1229   follow   the   signs   to   the   centre   of   the   village   (Post   Office   square) and   then   turn   south   down   Tower   Street,   passing   the   field   with   the   remains   of   the   old   fortified   manor   on   the   right.   The   Manor House   is   the   last   property   on   the   left.   As   mentioned   above,   please   note   that   the   Tower   Street   entrance   to   the   property   is   now closed   and   that   access   is   only   available   via   Lighthouse   Road.   Please   turn   left   on   to   Lighthouse   Road   and   pull   in   to   the   first   drive on the left. If you pass the church you have gone too far. For   SatNav   or   Web-maps   please   ignore   our   official   postcode   of   YO15   1PD   (which   covers   all   of   Tower   Street)   and   use   this postcode instead: YO15 1PY which will take you directly to the main entrance in Lighthouse Road.
Approaching the corner of Tower Street and Lighthouse Road, just past the Church
At the corner of Tower Street and Lighthouse Road, turn into Lighthouse Road : the Manor House is the first entrance on the left (shown above).
For SatNav or Web-maps please ignore our official postcode of YO15 1PD (which covers all of Tower Street) and use this postcode instead: YO15 1PY  which will take you directly to the main entrance in Lighthouse Road.

The North York Moors Railway

Views of Flamborough Head
The Manor House, Flamborough, Bridlington, East Riding of Yorkshire. YO15 1PD Telephone: 01262 850943    [International: +44 1262 850943] E-mail:  gm@flamboroughmanor.co.uk
Web-site design & content Copyright © 2017 Geoffrey Miller
The Manor House Accommodation, Books, Traditional Knitwear & Hand-Knitted Ganseys, Breton shirts Lesley Berry and Geoffrey Miller The Manor House Flamborough Bridlington East Riding of Yorkshire YO15 1PD United Kingdom Telephone: 01262 850943 (Mobile 07718 415234) International: +44 1262 850943 E-mail: gm@flamboroughmanor.co.uk
Flamborough Manor

The East and North Ridings

of Yorkshire

EAST RIDING: The landscape consists of a crescent of low chalk hills, the Yorkshire Wolds, surrounded by the low lying fertile plains of Holderness and the Vale of York. The Humber Estuary and North Sea mark its southern and eastern limits. Archaeological investigations have revealed artefacts and structures from all historical periods since the last ice age.

Places of Interest

There is a wide range of interesting places to visit in the East Riding. These include historic buildings such as Burnby Hall, Burton Agnes Manor House, Burton Agnes Hall, Sewerby Hall, Skipsea Castle and the gun battery of Fort Paull. The religious edifices of the Rudston Monolith, Beverley Minster and Beverley Friary, and Howden Minster can be visited at all seasons.
This is the mobile variant of our web-site, specially designed for viewing on smartphones, but lacking some of the more detailed information available on our full-size site..
Touring and Directions
Flamborough is well situated for touring the coast and places of interest in the East and North Ridings of Yorkshire. The cities of York and Hull are forty-four and thirty-seven miles away respectively, while two of the most interesting towns in the area — Beverley to the south and Whitby to the north — are within easy reach. Closer still are the resort towns of Bridlington (4 miles) and Scarborough (20 miles), as well as picturesque, unspoiled, Filey (12 miles). Country houses open to the public (not all year round) include the magnificent Castle Howard, delightful Burton Agnes Hall, Sledmere House with its famous Turkish room, Sewerby Hall, Burton Constable Hall and Beningborough. Others sites of interest are Kirkham Priory, Pickering and Helmsley Castles and Wharram Percy, a deserted medieval village. A considerable part of the North Riding has been preserved as the North York Moors National Park, through which runs the North York Moors Railway, operating steam and diesel train trips through the Park. On the fringes of the Park are the ruins of Rievaulx, Byland and Whitby Abbeys. Finally, dotted along the coast, are isolated fishing villages redolent of another age. Perhaps best known is Robin Hood’s Bay; however, Runswick Bay and Staithes are well worth a visit.
Burton Agnes Hall A   Norman   Manor   house,   the   lower   chamber   of   which   still   remains,   was first   constructed   on   this   site   in   1173.   Since   then   the   property   has   never been   sold,   though   it   has   passed   from   family   to   family   on   occasions   when the   male   line   has   ended.   In   1599   Sir   Henry   Griffith,   who   had   obtained   the property   via   the   female   line,   began   construction   of   a   new   house   on   the site,    using    the    architect    Robert    Smithson.    Smithson,    who    was    Master Mason   to   Elizabeth   I,   also   built   Longleat,   Wollaton   and   Hardwick.   Building was   complete   by   about   1610,   with   stone   quoins   contrasting   the   red-brick of   the   house.   The   estate   subsequently   passed   to   the   Boynton   family   when Sir   Henry   Griffith's   daughter   married   Sir   Matthew   Boynton,   and   remained in   the   Boynton   family   until   the   end   of   the   eighteenth   century   when   the estate   was   inherited   by   Cecily   Boynton,   who   married   Thomas   Lamplugh Wickham.    Since    the    1950s    the    house    has    been    extensively    restored, including   the   stunning   Long   Gallery.   Now   run   by   a   registered   charity,   the estate   remains   a   lived-in   family   home   occupied   by   descendants   of   the Boynton family.
Castle Howard In   1699   the   Third   Earl   of   Carlisle,   having   rejected   the   plans   of   a   leading architect,   approached   the   dramatist   John   Vanbrugh,   who,   at   that   point, had   never   built   anything   in   his   life.   Vanbrugh   subsequently   recruited Nicholas   Hawksmoor   to   assist   him   in   the   practical   side   of   design   and construction.   Although   the   final   western   wing   of   the   Garden   Front   was completed   by   1709,   building   proceeded   for   the   next   century.   Indeed, further   alterations   were   still   being   made   in   the   last   quarter   if   the   19th century   as   part   of   a   plan   to   harmonize   both   wings.   Tragically,   on   the morning   of   9   November   1940,   fire   broke   out   in   the   South-East   Wing   and swept   through   the   house   into   the   Great   Hall,   destroying   the   dome   and nearly   twenty   rooms.   In   1960-62   the   dome   was   rebuilt   and   redecorated, and,   as   time   and   money   permit,   the   gradual   task   of   restoring   the   fire- damaged sections continues.
Whitby Abbey Whitby   Abbey,   imposingly   sited   on   the   cliff   top,   was   founded   in   AD657. Seven   years   later,   the   Synod   was   held   here   to   debate   the   dating   of   Easter. The   Abbey   was   destroyed   during   a   Viking   invasion   in   AD867,   but   was revived   by   one   of   William   the   Conqueror’s   knights   in   the   late   1070s.   By 1220,   the   Norman   church   proved   too   small   for   the   many   pilgrims   who visited   it,   and   rebuilding   began.   However,   after   its   dissolution   in   1538,   the Abbey   passed   to   the   Cholmley   family,   whose   house   was   constructed   in large part from materials plundered from the monastery. Approaching    the    Abbey    from    the    town    involves    a    climb    of    199    steps (however,   car   access   is   available   from   the   south).   Be   sure   also   to   visit   the exquisite   St   Mary's   Church,   with   its   unusual   18th   century   interior,   carved by ship-builders.
Lastingham Nestling   near   the   edge   of   the   North   York   Moors   National   Park,   close   to the     picture-postcard     Hutton-le-Hole,     Lastingham     is     typical     of     the unspoiled   Moors'   villages.   A   monastery   was   founded   here   in   654   by   St Cedd,   and   flourished   until   the   Danes   destroyed   it   in   the   ninth   century.   In 1078   the   Abbot   of   Whitby   persuaded   the   King   to   restore   Lastingham,   and work    began    on    the    abbey.    However,    only    the    crypt,    which    has    has survived   unaltered,   was   completed   before   the   Abbot   and   his   monks   left abruptly to set up a new monastery in York.
Beverley The   first   Saxon   Church   in   Beverley   was   established   by   John   of   Beverley about   AD700.   By   AD937   a   second   church   had   been   built   to   replace   the first,   and   this   church   was   granted   the   right   of   sanctuary   by   King   Athelstan.     This   second   church   was   subsequently   enlarged   but   by   about   1170   a   third church,    this    time    built    in    the    Norman    Style,    replaced    the    old    Saxon church.    The    current    Minster    was    commenced    about    1220,    with    the construction   taking   two   centuries.   It   remains   to   this   day   one   of   the   best- loved   of   English   churches,   but   the   town   itself   is   also   not   be   missed.   It remains   a   lively,   thriving   Wolds'   market   town   with   a   wealth   of   historic architecture.
Robin Hood’s Bay Located   a   few   miles   south   of   Whitby   is   the   dramatic   sweep   of   Robin   Hood's Bay.    The    village    itself    nestles    in    a    cleft    and    is    barely    visible    in    the photograph.   Car   parking   is   readily   available   at   the   top   of   the   village.   The walk   down   to   the   beach   involves   a   steep   climb   back,   but   is   well   worth   the effort.
How to find us : If    approaching    from    Bridlington    on    the    B1255,    the    road sweeps    down    a    hill    into    the    village,    passing    Flamborough Parish   Church   (St   Oswald’s)   on   the   right.   Just   past   the   church the   road   turns   sharply   to   the   left   at   the   junction   of   Tower Street    and    Lighthouse    Road.    The    Manor    House    is    on    this corner,   but   you   must   turn   right   into   Lighthouse   Road   and   we are   the   first   entrance   on   the   left.   Look   for   signs   announcing "Antiques    and    Sweaters"    —    the    stable    at    the    front    of    the house   has   been   converted   into   a   small   shop;   the   house   itself is   set   back   from   the   road.   There   is   ample   parking   in   front   of the   shop.   Please   note   that   the   Tower   Street   entrance   to   the property   is   no   longer   in   use   and   that   access   is   only   available via Lighthouse Road. If   approaching   from   the   Scarborough   direction   on   the   B1229 follow   the   signs   to   the   centre   of   the   village   (Post   Office   square) and   then   turn   south   down   Tower   Street,   passing   the   field   with the   remains   of   the   old   fortified   manor   on   the   right.   The   Manor House   is   the   last   property   on   the   left.   As   mentioned   above, please   note   that   the   Tower   Street   entrance   to   the   property   is now   closed   and   that   access   is   only   available   via   Lighthouse Road.   Please   turn   left   on   to   Lighthouse   Road   and   pull   in   to   the first   drive   on   the   left.   If   you   pass   the   church   you   have   gone too far. For   SatNav   or   Web-maps   please   ignore   our   official   postcode of   YO15   1PD   (which   covers   all   of   Tower   Street)   and   use   this postcode   instead:   YO15   1PY   which   will   take   you   directly   to   the main entrance in Lighthouse Road.
Approaching the corner of Tower Street and Lighthouse Road, just past the Church
At the corner of Tower Street and Lighthouse Road, turn into Lighthouse Road : the Manor House is the first entrance on the left (shown above).
For SatNav or Web-maps please ignore our official postcode of YO15 1PD (which covers all of Tower Street) and use this postcode instead: YO15 1PY which will take you directly to the main entrance in Lighthouse Road.

The North York Moors Railway

Views of Flamborough Head
The Manor House, Flamborough, Bridlington, East Riding of Yorkshire. YO15 1PD Telephone: 01262 850943    [International: +44 1262 850943] E-mail:  gm@flamboroughmanor.co.uk
Web-site design & content Copyright © 2017 Geoffrey Miller
The Manor House Accommodation, Books, Traditional Knitwear & Hand-Knitted Ganseys, Breton shirts Lesley Berry and Geoffrey Miller The Manor House Flamborough Bridlington East Riding of Yorkshire YO15 1PD United Kingdom Telephone: 01262 850943 (Mobile 07718 415234) International: +44 1262 850943 E-mail: gm@flamboroughmanor.co.uk
The Manor House Flamborough Bridlington East Riding of Yorkshire Telephone 01262 850943